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Scientific Name: Stenella coeruleoalba
Suborder: Odontoceti
Family: Delphinidae
Size: 1.8 - 2.5 m
Weight: 90 - 150 Kg
Group Size: 10 - 500 individuals
Habitat: Offshore (sometimes Inshore)
Hemisphere: Both
Striped Dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)
Known as one of the most active and acrobatic Cetaceans, the Striped Dolphin is almost unmistakable due to the typical stripe that runs from the eye to the tail stock.
Some confusion may arise with the Common Dolphins, but the lack of a yellow hourglass pattern on both sides of the Striped Dolphin greatly helps to tell these species apart.

The Striped Dolphin has a long beak, with a distinct crease separating it from the melon.
The dorsal fin is falcate, and its streamlined, robust body allows it to reach considerable speeds.
It is known to dive to at least 700 metres.

Despite its generally elusive nature, the Mediterranean Sea populations are known to readily approach boats and bow-ride.

The Striped Dolphin can be seen in tropical, subtropical, and warm-temperate pelagic waters, where it forms groups of up to 500 individuals and more.
In the Mediterranean Sea, where Stenella coeruleoalba is probably the most abundant member of the "Delphinidae" family, group sizes are much smaller, rarely exceeding 40 individuals.

The diet varies according to the availability of food, but it is mostly based on small Cephalopods (e.g. squids) and fish.

The Striped Dolphin appears to perform migrations in most of the areas where it is found, and generally follows the seasonal patterns of warm current fronts.

Unlike many other Cetaceans, the Striped Dolphin is not considered as endangered, though it has been targeted for a long time by fishermen in various parts of the world, and it is still victim of gill nets, purse seines and drill nets.
Along with the Common Dolphin, it is a common by-catch in tuna fishery.